The Ultimate Touring Bicycle Buyer’s Guide – 2013 Edition – Available Now!

By Darren Alff

The 2013 edition of my wildly popular eBook, “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles” is out today… and you can grab it a copy of it right now on this page.

This updated version of the book not only comes with 70+ pages of touring bike specific content, but also more than 130 different  touring bicycles made by both large and small companies all around the world.

Why did I create “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles?”

After running the website here at BicycleTouringPro.com for more than five years and after receiving thousands and thousands of questions from people just like you who wanted to know what to look for in a quality touring bicycle, I decided a few years back that I should put together everything I know about touring bicycles and compile it all into the world’s greatest resource for touring bike buyers.

Over the last three years, “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles” has quickly skyrocketed to the most popular piece of information on this entire website, and has helped thousands of people from all around the world find their ideal bicycle touring vehicle.

For people who are new to bicycle touring, the process of finding a touring bicycle can be daunting. You have to do a bunch of research, figure out what kind of touring bicycles are available, decide which bicycle features are important to you, negotiate the buying process, ask for advice on which type of bicycle you should buy, and a whole lot more. At the end of it all, many first-time buyers still aren’t sure if they’re getting the right bicycle for the type of bike tour they wish to participate in.

This is where “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles” comes in and saves the day! With this book, all of the mystery has been taken out of finding and buying a new touring bicycle.

With “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles” as your guide, you will learn about the five major types of bicycle tours and the five major types of touring bicycles.

Did you know, for example, that there are several different types of touring bicycles and that each type of touring bike has been designed for a specific type of bicycle touring? And did you know that many first-time touring bike buyers end up purchasing a bicycle that was not designed for the type of bicycle touring that they wish to participate in? This can be a huge and costly mistake! That’s why “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles” talks about this at great length… and why it discusses a number of other important things you should know about touring bicycles before you go out and buy one for yourself!

Inside the book you will learn about:

  • The five majors types of bicycle touring and the five different types of touring bicycles.
  • How to determine which type of touring bicycle you need.
  • Which metals are most popular in touring bike frames and why the metal you select for your touring bike is so important.
  • How to get the right size bicycle for your body type.
  • Which wheels, gears and handlebars you should have on your bike.
  • What kind of shifters, brakes and pedals are best for touring bicycles.
  • The process you need to go through when purchasing a new or custom-built bicycle.
  • The best time of year to purchase a touring bicycle and save lots of money.
  • Popular touring bicycle scams you should know about.
  • And a whole lot more!

With 70+ pages of content and a directory featuring more than 130 touring bicycles, this new and improved version of “The Essential Guide To Touring Bicycles” is ready and waiting to help you find your perfect touring bike.

More information can be found at www.touringbicyclebook.com.

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5 Comments

  1. Spencer

    April 13, 2012 at 6:13 pm

    Darren,

    Hi. I enjoy your website. I just have one question. I keep breaking off the stem on my presta bike tubes. It is the small part you unscrew to put air in the tires. If I unscrew it to put air in the tires it is bent slightly when I take the pump off. Just a few times of pumping up my tires, then the piece breaks off, then the tube looses air and the whole tube is useless.

    In the past 3 years I have gone through many tubes this way. This is the only reason I had to put in new tubes.

    Do you know of a solution? I could be putting air in the tubes wrong– Or a better pump maybe– In your years of biking have you had this problem also??

    thanks.
    Spencer

    • Bicycle Touring Pro

      April 13, 2012 at 11:26 pm

      Spencer,

      Never in my life have I broken a presta valve. I’m guessing you are doing something wrong. What kind of bicycle pump are you using? That sounds like it might be your problem!

  2. Arthur Lamy

    June 3, 2012 at 7:03 am

    Hi,
    This is common among riders who use a modern ‘push-on’ pump.
    One way to remedy this:
    When you’ve finished pumping, unlock the pump ( it has a clamp to hold it in place when pumping) then knock it off the valve with a light blow going at 90 degrees to the valve stem.
    I think that it is usually trying to prise the pump off the valve that does the damage.
    If this does not work, use an old-fashioned pump with a piece of hose that goes between the pump and the valve. I usually take a big bore MTB pump with me in my pannier. It’s inexpensive and pumps fast.

  3. Rickonabike

    August 30, 2013 at 4:18 pm

    I’ve broken PLENTY of Presta valves. Had my custom rims drilled out for Schraders. I can air up at gas stations without an adapter and I’ve NEVER had a valve fail. NEVER. Has a few break off AFTER they were flat and I had over 2000 miles on them, bot no big deal as I ride with a spare. In 15,000 trekking miles I’ve had to replace tubes TWICE. In 3000 miles, I replaced FOUR Presta valved tubes. Maybe I’m unlucky. I dunno, but Schraders are universal and more durable.

  4. Mike Seats

    September 20, 2013 at 7:06 pm

    I had the same problem with a presta valve on a tube just last week. If you are using a push-on pump, as most people do, make sure you use two hands
    and be careful not to bend the valve when applying and releasing the pump. I agree with the previous comment that this is less of a risk with schrader valves.

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